Of Blooms & Bliss: Colly Flowers in Morristown

A natural creative follows her gut and grows a business.

 

Photo by Laura Baer

Kori Gervasio, 31, has always had a knack for putting together reflective and personal social events. “I’ve always loved weddings and parties, any kind of celebration,” she says. As early as 12 years old, Gervasio, a Randolph native, could be found poring over Martha Stewart publications. Eventually, she became a graphic designer and ventured into an event-planning business with a friend. “[My partner] did all the planning; I did all the creative things. I found myself directing the florists on arrangements,” she says.

Orchestrating the pretty details was Gervasio’s natural bent, and she wanted to do it in a more hands-on way. Always keen on flowers, though not a gardener, she decided to follow the scent anyway. After a short course at the Flower School of New York, she launched Colly Flowers in November 2017.

The jewel-box shop is filled with fresh florals in imaginative palettes that change weekly. Cut flowers, potted plants, and surprisingly simple yet stunning wreaths that incorporate branches, berries and blooms are among the growing inventory. Just as charming are the gift items.

Photo by Laura Baer

Gervasio handpicks the store’s fanciful trays, delicate jewelry, quirky kitchenware, books, baby items, soaps and candles. “When I travel, I walk through lots of shops. I knew the brands I wanted to carry. I love and use and believe in all of the products I stock,” Gervasio says. All of her goods are American made—and many are by women, she notes.

Running the business is a ton of work, she says, but it was expected. “I did this as a side hustle for so long, it is good to focus on. I love doing so many different things.”

And the shop name? After searching for a moniker that resonated, Gervasio opened a book of vintage prints and saw a vegetable sketch labeled colly flower. It spoke to her, and she followed her instinct.

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