Monday November 24, 2014SUBSCRIBE
New Jersey Monthly Magazine
Towns & Schools
| |     

2010 Top High Schools

Proven winners stay on top of our rankings, but all New Jersey public high schools face a host of new and daunting challenges this year.

Posted August 16, 2010

Do you like this story?

top high schools 2010 article

Click here to view New Jersey's Top Towns.

Any champion will tell you the toughest challenge is staying on top. But that’s just what Millburn High School managed to do in this year’s ranking of the state’s top public high schools. The Essex County school, which was number 1 in the New Jersey Monthly ranking in 2008, repeats as our high school champ in 2010.

In fact, the top of this year’s high school ranking is almost identical to the 2008 list, with McNair Academic of Jersey City and Tenafly High School repeating in the number 2 and number 3 spots, and Glen Ridge High School moving up one notch to number 4.

The Top High Schools list is based on data reported by the schools to the Department of Education for the 2008-2009 school year. Click here for an explanation of our methodology.

In addition to publishing the Top 100 Public High Schools in this section, we also have compiled the top 10 schools by District Factor Group, which ranks schools based on their socioeconomic peer group (click here to view the rankings by district factor group); and a list of the Top 10 Most Improved High Schools, based on our ranking. See the full rankings below.

What the rankings do not tell us is how the schools will fare after losing $820 million in direct state aid this year. Under Governor Chris Christie’s cuts, many of the state’s most successful school districts lost every penny of state cash assistance (although the state will pay for certain teacher benefits and the districts’ social security contributions).

That’s the case at Millburn High School, where aid was cut from $3 million for 2009-2010 to zero for the new school year. MHS principal William Miron says the cuts forced an approximate 7 percent reduction in his school’s budget. That has meant increasing some class sizes, eliminating some classes (five sections of Chinese instead of seven), merging a number of clubs, and cutting back sports schedules. Districtwide, about six administrative positions were eliminated, some through retirements; administrative responsibilities were spread among teachers through the creation of department-chair positions.

“We did a pretty good job of contracting without eliminating teaching positions,” Miron says.

A similar scenario is playing out at New Providence High School in Union County, which made a strong leap in the new ranking, moving from number 17 to number 5. The district’s state aid was cut from $1.48 million to zero. NPHS principal Paul Casarico reports that seven teaching and support positions were eliminated districtwide, including two and a half teaching positions at the high school. “Some of the opportunities that kids could take part in won’t be there this year,” Casarico says. At the high school, that means larger class sizes, fewer coaches (although no sports were dropped), and fewer clubs and activities.

Further down the rankings, Glassboro High School is also feeling the pain; its district lost $1.7 million, or 10 percent of its state funding. As a result, four and a third teaching positions were cut at the high school, and class sizes have grown, especially in electives like art and African-American history, says principal Santina S. Haldeman. Her school also cut several teams (cross-country, winter track, spring golf), the fall play, and an after-school weight-lifting program.

Glassboro, which has many students from low-income housing areas, has made good progress, moving from number 197 to number 188 in the rankings. (It is number 10 among its District Factor Group peers.) But Haldeman is concerned about hanging onto the gains. “I worry about what the future will bring,” she says. “I think this is just the beginning. I can’t imagine how it will be a year from now in terms of loss of teachers and programs.”

Click on the links below to read our Top High Schools rankings in the categories listed:

Click here to view the 2010 Top High Schools methodology


Full 2010 Top High Schools rankings (pdf)

2010 Top High School rankings (alphabetical)

2010 Top High School rankings (by county)

2010 Top High School rankings (by district factor group)



RANK
Full Top High Schools Rankings
2010
2008
High School
County
1
1
Millburn Essex
2
2
McNair Academic (Jersey City) Hudson
3
3
Tenafly Bergen
4
5
Glen Ridge Essex
5
17
New Providence Union
6
8
Northern Highlands Regional (Allendale) Bergen
7
12
Pascack Hills (Montvale) Bergen
8
10
Chatham Morris
9
4
Mountain Lakes Morris
10
16
Montgomery Somerset
11
14
Haddonfield Memorial Camden
12
24
Ridge (Bernards Twp) Somerset
13
29
Cranford Union
14
9
Northern Valley Regional (Demarest) Bergen
15
35
Madison Morris
16
21
West Windsor–Plainsboro South Mercer
17
11
Holmdel Monmouth
18
31
Park Ridge Bergen
19
23
Ramapo (Franklin Lakes) Bergen
20
7
Ridgewood Bergen
21
34
Kinnelon Morris
22
20
Livingston Essex
23
25
Pascack Valley (Hillsdale) Bergen
24
15
Governor Livingston (Berkeley Heights) Union
25
22
Summit Union
26
38
West Morris Mendham Morris
27
37
River Dell Regional (Oradell) Bergen
28
28
Glen Rock Bergen
29
19
West Windsor–Plainsboro North Mercer
30
18
Northern Valley Regional (Old Tappan) Bergen
31
30
Rumson–Fair Haven Regional Monmouth
32
36
Bernards (Bernardsville) Somerset
33
13
Ramsey Bergen
34
55
Emerson Bergen
35
40
Indian Hills (Oakland) Bergen
36
48
West Essex (North Caldwell) Essex
37
33
Highland Park Middlesex
38
39
Hopewell Valley Central (Pennington) Mercer
39
47
Moorestown Burlington
40
32
Jonathan Dayton (Springfield) Union
41
27
Westfield Union
42
45
Whippany Park Morris
43
42
West Morris Central (Chester) Morris
44
6
Princeton Mercer
45
57
James Caldwell (West Caldwell) Essex
46
100
Pequannock Twp Morris
47
54
Montville Morris
48
49
Watchung Hills Regional Somerset
49
51
Leonia Bergen
50
87
Parsippany Hills Morris
51
60
Wayne Hills Passaic
52
65
Randolph Morris
53
53
Verona Essex
54
86
Metuchen Middlesex
55
26
Cresskill Bergen
56
68
Mahwah Bergen
57
61
Cherry Hill East Camden
58
59
Point Pleasant Beach Ocean
59
41
Voorhees (Lebanon Twp) Hunterdon
60
43
North Hunterdon Regional (Clinton Twp) Hunterdon
61
64
Red Bank Regional Monmouth
62
69
Scotch Plains–Fanwood Union
63
46
Wayne Valley Passaic
64
97
Ocean Twp Monmouth
65
52
J. P. Stevens (Edison) Middlesex
66
78
Morristown Morris
67
91
Bridgewater-Raritan Somerset
68
93
Waldwick Bergen
69
50
Science (Newark) Essex
70
106
Morris Hills (Rockaway) Morris
71
76
East Brunswick Middlesex
72
75
Fort Lee Bergen
73
72
Rutherford Bergen
74
58
South Hunterdon Regional (West Amwell) Hunterdon
75
89
Columbia (Maplewood) Essex
76
81
Fair Lawn Bergen
77
73
Somerville Somerset
78
63
Sparta Sussex
79
88
Morris Knolls (Denville) Morris
80
109
Colts Neck Monmouth
81
84
Hillsborough Somerset
82
90
Allentown Monmouth
83
128
Dwight Morrow (Englewood) Bergen
84
104
Parsippany Morris
85
62
Hunterdon Central (Flemington) Hunterdon
86
79
Eastern Regional (Voorhees) Camden
87
118
Palisades Park Bergen
88
83
Delaware Valley Regional (Alexandria) Hunterdon
89
74
South Brunswick Middlesex
90
107
Mount Olive Morris
91
96
Cherry Hill West Camden
92
56
Westwood Bergen
93
117
Marlboro Monmouth
94
85
Montclair Essex
95
92
Middletown South Monmouth
96
67
Hanover Park Morris
97
80
Haddon Twp Camden
98
77
Paramus Bergen
99
110
Ocean City Cape May
100
108
Shawnee (Medford) Burlington
101
95
Arthur L. Johnson (Clark) Union
102
103
Secaucus Hudson
103
70
Cedar Grove Essex
104
119
Weehawken Hudson
105
126
Spotswood Middlesex
106
162
Dumont Bergen
107
82
Hasbrouck Heights Bergen
108
105
Lenape Valley Regional (Stanhope) Sussex
109
n/a
Robbinsville High School Mercer
110
166
Dunellen Middlesex
111
94
Shore Regional (West Long Branch) Monmouth
112
135
Ridgefield Memorial Bergen
113
178
David Brearley (Kenilworth) Union
114
121
Teaneck Bergen
115
98
Roxbury Morris
116
44
Midland Park Bergen
117
196
Creative and Performing Arts (Camden) Camden
118
113
Monroe Twp Middlesex
119
102
Pitman Gloucester
120
124
Lawrence Mercer
121
176
Henry Hudson Regional (Highlands) Monmouth
122
120
Lenape (Medford) Burlington
123
137
Rosa Parks Arts (Paterson) Passaic
124
115
Manasquan Monmouth
125
157
High Point Regional (Sussex) Sussex
126
111
Matawan Regional Monmouth
127
125
Manalapan Monmouth
128
114
West Orange Essex
129
168
Haddon Heights Camden
130
112
Boonton Morris
131
66
University (Newark) Essex
132
129
Freehold Borough Monmouth
133
172
Point Pleasant Ocean
134
152
Cherokee (Evesham Twp) Burlington
135
134
Seneca (Tabernacle) Burlington
136
234
Bergenfield Bergen
137
101
Wood-Ridge Bergen
138
194
North Warren Regional (Blairstown) Warren
139
116
Mainland Regional (Linwood) Atlantic
140
146
Piscataway Middlesex
141
198
North Arlington Bergen
142
130
Clearview Regional (Harrison Twp) Gloucester
143
132
North Brunswick Middlesex
144
170
Passaic Valley (Little Falls) Passaic
145
131
Lakeland Regional (Wanaque) Passaic
146
171
John F. Kennedy Memorial (Woodbridge) Middlesex
147
187
Woodstown Salem
148
158
South Plainfield Middlesex
149
163
Kittatinny Regional (Hampton Twp) Sussex
150
138
Henry P. Becton Regional (East Rutherford) Bergen
151
173
Bogota Bergen
152
156
Vernon Sussex
153
140
Burlington Twp Burlington
154
192
Southern Regional (Stafford Twp) Ocean
155
127
Wall Monmouth
156
165
Technology (Newark) Essex
157
71
Brimm Medical Arts (Camden) Camden
158
167
Jefferson Twp Morris
159
143
Middletown North Monmouth
160
141
Nutley Essex
161
99
New Milford Bergen
162
211
Old Bridge Middlesex
163
245
Liberty (Jersey City) Hudson
164
161
Cinnaminson Burlington
165
209
South Amboy Middlesex
166
164
Raritan (Hazlet) Monmouth
167
160
Newton Sussex
168
207
Arthur P. Schalick (Pittsgrove) Salem
169
177
Edison Middlesex
170
142
Saddle Brook Bergen
171
148
Hawthorne Passaic
172
195
Audubon Camden
173
136
Pompton Lakes Passaic
174
159
Howell Monmouth
175
149
Washington Twp Gloucester
176
123
Butler Morris
177
133
Monmouth Regional (Tinton Falls) Monmouth
178
182
Lyndhurst Bergen
179
155
Delran Burlington
180
175
Hightstown Mercer
181
214
Jackson Memorial Ocean
182
185
West Deptford Gloucester
183
169
Middlesex Middlesex
184
147
Keansburg Monmouth
185
191
West Milford Passaic
186
153
Northern Burlington Regional (Columbus) Burlington
187
139
Hoboken Hudson
188
197
Glassboro Gloucester
189
199
Hamilton East-Steinert Mercer
190
145
Roselle Park Union
191
236
Hackettstown Warren
192
188
Colonia Middlesex
193
n/a
Barnegat High School Ocean
194
190
Gloucester City Camden
195
189
Wallkill Valley Regional (Hamburg) Sussex
196
144
Manville Somerset
197
151
Gateway Regional (Woodbury Heights) Gloucester
198
184
Hackensack Bergen
199
203
Woodbury Gloucester
200
174
Hopatcong Sussex
201
150
Franklin Twp (Somerset) Somerset
202
179
Warren Hills Regional (Washington) Warren
203
193
New Egypt Ocean
204
200
Wallington Bergen
205
154
Arts (Newark) Essex
206
246
Long Branch Monmouth
207
180
Ridgefield Park Bergen
208
224
Palmyra Burlington
209
206
Pennsville Memorial Salem
210
201
Memorial (Elmwood Park) Bergen
211
n/a
Met East High Camden
212
122
Freehold Twp Monmouth
213
216
Harrison Hudson
214
228
Belleville Essex
215
n/a
Jackson Liberty High Ocean
216
218
Kingsway Regional (Swedesboro) Gloucester
217
287
Hillside Union
218
208
Bordentown Regional Burlington
219
240
Timber Creek Regional (Gloucester Twp) Camden
220
215
Dover Morris
221
292
Cicely Tyson Performing Arts (East Orange) Essex
222
212
Toms River North Ocean
223
242
Rancocas Valley Regional (Mount Holly) Burlington
224
210
Clayton Gloucester
225
238
Lacey Twp Ocean
226
181
Bloomfield Essex
227
217
Egg Harbor Twp Atlantic
228
n/a
International High Passaic
229
231
Woodbridge Middlesex
230
235
Kearny Hudson
231
225
Sterling (Somerdale) Camden
232
213
Sayreville War Memorial Middlesex
233
239
Hammonton Atlantic
234
186
South River Middlesex
235
220
Cliffside Park Bergen
236
205
Lower Cape May Regional (Cape May) Cape May
237
183
Florence Twp Memorial Burlington
238
230
Absegami (Absecon) Atlantic
239
204
Toms River East Ocean
240
219
Lodi Bergen
241
227
Manchester Regional (Haledon) Passaic
242
248
Bayonne Hudson
243
229
Union Union
244
254
Oakcrest (Hamilton Twp) Atlantic
245
258
Ewing Mercer
246
202
Delsea Regional (Franklin Twp) Gloucester
247
255
Atlantic City Atlantic
248
251
Brick Twp Ocean
249
265
Keyport Monmouth
250
250
Belvidere Warren
251
261
Brick Memorial Ocean
252
269
Highland Regional (Blackwood) Camden
253
266
Penns Grove Salem
254
256
Lindenwold Camden
255
252
Deptford Twp Gloucester
256
226
North Plainfield Somerset
257
273
Central Regional (Berkeley Twp) Ocean
258
262
Hamilton West-Watson Mercer
259
223
Clifton Passaic
260
244
Manchester Ocean
261
249
Rahway Union
262
241
Pinelands Regional (Little Egg Harbor) Ocean
263
232
Middle Twp Cape May
264
260
Hamilton North-Nottingham Mercer
265
277
Paulsboro Gloucester
266
257
Pemberton Twp Burlington
267
237
Collingswood Camden
268
267
Burlington City Burlington
269
264
Toms River South Ocean
270
259
Williamstown Gloucester
271
288
Emerson Hudson
272
283
Abraham Clark (Roselle) Union
273
282
Memorial (West New York) Hudson
274
278
Central (Newark) Essex
275
222
Vineland South Cumberland
276
275
Phillipsburg Warren
277
284
Salem Salem
278
221
Triton (Runnemede) Camden
279
253
Wildwood Cape May
280
281
Asbury Park Monmouth
281
298
Riverside Burlington
282
303
New Brunswick Middlesex
283
268
Neptune Monmouth
284
299
Linden Union
285
233
Union Hill (Union City) Hudson
286
285
Garfield Bergen
287
307
Irvington Essex
288
243
Bound Brook Somerset
289
311
Eastside (Paterson) Passaic
290
314
John F. Kennedy (Paterson) Passaic
291
279
Cumberland Regional (Upper Deerfield) Cumberland
292
263
East Orange Campus Essex
293
301
East Side (Newark) Essex
294
302
Elizabeth Union
295
247
Willingboro Burlington
296
294
North Bergen Hudson
297
286
Buena Regional Atlantic
298
290
Pennsauken Camden
299
309
Pleasantville Atlantic
300
276
Overbrook (Pine Hill) Camden
301
271
Maple Shade Burlington
302
272
Carteret Middlesex
303
297
Bridgeton Cumberland
304
n/a
Newark Vocational Essex
305
291
Lincoln (Jersey City) Hudson
306
289
Millville Cumberland
307
293
Plainfield Union
308
295
William L. Dickinson (Jersey City) Hudson
309
274
Winslow Twp Camden
310
305
Weequahic (Newark) Essex
311
306
Barringer (Newark) Essex
312
304
Henry Snyder (Jersey City) Hudson
313
312
Passaic Passaic
314
296
Malcolm X Shabazz (Newark) Essex
315
308
Orange Essex
316
300
Lakewood Ocean
317
310
Trenton Central Mercer
318
270
Perth Amboy Middlesex
319
313
West Side (Newark) Essex
320
280
James J. Ferris (Jersey City) Hudson
321
315
Woodrow Wilson (Camden) Camden
322
316
Camden Camden


Related Articles:

The Top New Jersey High Schools: Alphabetical
The Burden of Homework: Stressed For Success?
A New Charter School In Newark Faces Growing Pains
An Expert Discusses the Pros and Cons of Teacher Evaluation
Top Vocational High Schools in New Jersey
Rating New Jersey's Teachers
2012 Top High Schools Methodology


If you like this article please share it.


Comments
Hudson County Schools of Technolgy

How do you or do you calculate the County Vocational-Technical Schools comprehensive high schools. I am the Director of Development for Hudson County Schoools of Technology and I did not read any statistics on High Tech or County Prep HS? NJ Monthly has calculated our schools of choice in the past--our schools are similiar to MaNair. Is there a way to discuss the process?? 201 835-3893 Thank you

Posted by: Linda Quentzel, Secaucus | Aug 26, 2010 01:57:43 AM |

Bergen County Academies

How about Bergen County Academies?? This is by far the best school in the State and it’s not even ranked? How is that possible?

Posted by: Dulcinea, Bergen | Aug 26, 2010 04:15:31 AM |

Top High Schools methodology

The Top High Schools rankings are based entirely on information reported by the schools to the NJ Department of Education. As explained in the Methodology, certain charter schools and some academies and magnet high schools did not report enough data to be included in the rankings. A link to the complete methodology is available at the top of this page.

Posted by: New Jersey Monthly, Morristown | Aug 27, 2010 14:25:27 PM |

Bergen County Academies and High Tech High

The US News & World Report rankings of public high schools in the US include Bergen County Academies and High Tech High. http://www.usnews.com/articles/education/high-schools/2009/12/09/americas-best-high-schools-gold-medal-list.html You will see that these two schools rank far better nationally than any of NJ’s public high schools. They’re in a completely different league and have a different way of operating (i.e., must apply to get in), so it’s not surprising that they were left out of this list. In any event, I would trust US News’ methodology much more than the one used in this ranking; they somehow find a way to include schools that are clearly at the top.

Posted by: P., Kinnelon | Aug 27, 2010 16:54:28 PM |

academic achievement and money

Rank the districts in order of average household income or net worth and see how close that list is to this one. Kids in the affluent suburbs and those lucky enough to win the charter school lottery get first dibs when it comes to an education and an employable future, while the kids in the inner cities or poor rural areas get nothing. No politicians have the backbone to do anything about funding methodologies, then everyone wonders why our urban/poor district schools fail. Same discussion has been going on for decades.

Posted by: DS, Fanwood | Aug 27, 2010 17:47:47 PM |

schools and money

DS is voicing a common complaint. That schools in affluent communities do a better job in educating than those in inner cities and poorer communities ... and that somehow it’s all about money. Not so fast, DS. The facts show otherwise. Quite a few inner city schools spend more per student than some of the best schools on the list. A lot more. And despite years of Abbott District funding that pushed additional money into inner city and poorer-performing districts, what does the state have to show for it? In reality, many poor performing districts simply haven’t spent their money wisely, overstaffing with highly-paid administrators instead of putting the money into teachers. And many of these same districts have been run by one party for decades, yet the voters keep them in office instead of replacing them with people who offer new ideas and better results. No, it takes more than money to provide a good education. Virtually every one of the top schools on this list sets high standards and enjoys a high degree of parental support and involvement. It’s time for voters in poorer-performing districts to stop blaming and start examining what they can do differently to get the results every parent wants.

Posted by: rob earl, ho-ho-kus | Aug 28, 2010 15:41:21 PM |

The list doesn’t take into consideration the atmosphere of the school due to the quality of the kids who populate it. For example, Marlboro High School doesn’t fare too badly on the list, but your kid would be better off without the nasty, weird, personality-disordered people who go there.

In lieu of this list, just find a ranking of NJ towns by income, then live in the wealthiest one you can afford that has good people residing there.

Posted by: K.A., Central NJ | Aug 29, 2010 14:29:09 PM |

nj school ratings

these are the ratings from the ’08 - ’09 year....they were just published within the last 2 weeks....some big surprises of worsened ratings....

Posted by: audrey, hoboken | Aug 30, 2010 11:56:03 AM |

nj school ratings

Hoboken still doing surprisingly well--- given last ranking they were the 2nd most improved in the state. 2008-09-- they took at hit. Wonder why?

Posted by: C. Marshall, hoboken | Aug 30, 2010 18:10:41 PM |

nj school ratings

Looking at your list, it snot clear why some factors appear to be weighted more heavily than others for your rankings. For instance, in Egg Harbor Township (rank 227), 26 different AP tests are offered, 73% of test takers score a +3, the average SAT is 1445, and 85% of students go on to attend at least a two year institution. However, the average class size is large (24.6). In Hackensack (rank 198), the average SAT is 1336, 26 AP courses are offered, but only 31% of test takers score a +3. Also, 86% of students go on to attend at least a two year institution. In Hackensack, however, class size is somewhat small, with an average class size of 22.1. As someone who looks at data for a living, I would say that the school with a higher SAT and better performance on the AP tests is the better school. However, the algorithm/regression equation you are using appears to place an inordinate emphasis on class size.

Posted by: FFB, Egg Harbor Township | Aug 30, 2010 22:16:43 PM |

NJ Top High Schools

Re: Princeton High School (PHS) rank of 44 this year. There may be an error in the survey on stated % of graduates going to 4 yr college.

NJ Monthly full ranking list shows 66% of PHS graduates going to 4 yr college. PHS website shows 85% of graduates going to 4 yr college (80-90% range has been the case for the last several years). The 85% ,SAT avg. score of 1856 and all other factors should have Princeton much closer to last years ranking of 6. Hopeful NJ Monthy will resolve this and update the rankings.

Posted by: LW, Princeton | Aug 31, 2010 21:20:50 PM |

Omission of Newark Tech

Every year that I read this list, I am deeply disappointed for my students and staff - the students and staff of "The Mighty" Newark Tech. We are a part of the Essex County Vocational - Technical Schools District. For whatever the reason, you do not recognize the vocational-technical schools, which are also NJ public schools. In ’09, my seniors graduated with 98% proficiency on the Languages Arts portion of the HSPA and 88% proficiency in Math. In 2010, my seniors graduated with 100% proficiency in Language Arts and 88% proficiency in Math. These numbers are phenomenal not only for a school in Newark, but for an inner-city school in which almost 90% of the students are economically disadvantaged. We prove year after year that poverty is an unacceptable excuse. US News and World Report Magazine even recognized us for two consecutive years as one of America’s best high schools. I might add that in my principal capacity, I was a 2009 recipient of the prestigious Milken National Educator Award which speaks volumes to what we have accomplished here. I urge you to consider the vocational-technical schools next year. Many of us are doing a phenomenal job educating the same children as the traditional comprehensive high schools. I might add that one of our sister schools - Bloomfield Tech is a Blue Ribbon School, a National Title 1 Distinguished School and recognized by US News and World Report for two consecutive years as well. I thank you in advance for your consideration.

Principal Baruti K. Kafele

Posted by: Principal Baruti Kafele, Jersey City | Aug 31, 2010 22:27:11 PM |

Top Schools

Great Report and very useful for my real estate practice.

Thanks.

Danny

Posted by: Danny Kahn, Upper Saddle River | Sep 02, 2010 15:48:30 PM |

not scientific rating

Princeton ranks 44??? this can only prove that your ranking has problem. also, Ridge school ranks top in the national ratings.

Posted by: Harry, bERNARDS | Sep 08, 2010 00:33:37 AM |

Princeton

Criteria used to rank Princeton as been identified and pointed out. Why hasn’t NJmonthly corrected this error? Bergenfield better than New Milford or Wall? Definitely some holes in this list.

Posted by: Rick, Hillsborough | Sep 09, 2010 01:12:09 AM |

Funding

Instead of complaining, why don’t the students and schools participate in fundraisers?? All I recall getting in school were textbooks. Everything else was funded by my parents. School supplies, ice cream money, field trips, etc. I recall fundraising for anything additional. Why don’t the teachers use the budget as a tool to demonstrate how to achieve with limited means, rather than complaining about not getting handouts on the backs of the taxpayers?? It shows a strong work ethic. Is there something wrong with teaching hard work as a route to success??

Posted by: Cheryl A. Wright, Buena Boro/Landisville | Sep 29, 2010 18:09:33 PM |

Princeton/Bergen

Most of the whining is emanating from Princeton proper and Bergen County. What a surprise. Some status symbols just can’t be purchased like a house or a car.

Posted by: Larry Jones, Montgomery | Nov 01, 2010 19:05:13 PM |

Demographics

Of the ’top’ 100 schools in the NJ Monthly ranking, the vast majority are found in towns in which more than 90% of the population is white or Asian. Only eight schools in the top 100 are found in towns with a combined "white and Asian" population percentage that matches or falls below the overall U.S. average (which was 79% in the 2000 census) for these populations.

Here are some more granular breakdowns:

--60 of the top 100 schools are in towns in which the combined white and Asian population percentage is 95% or higher;

--85 of the top 100 schools are in towns in which the combined white and Asian population percentage is 90% or higher;

--Perhaps more importantly, only 2 of the top 50 schools drop below this 90% threshold (McNair and Highland Park);

--92 of the top 100 schools are in towns in which the combined white and Asian population is 80% or higher.

The eight schools in the top 100 whose hometowns are either at or below the national average for white + Asian populations (79%) are the following. (I’ve put their NJ Monthly ranking in parentheses before each one, and have put the name of their town and the percentage of their town’s population that is white + Asian in parentheses after:)

(2) McNair Academy (Jersey City; 50.2%*)
(61) Red Bank Regional (Red Bank; 70.4%)
(66) Morristown (Morristown; 70.9%)
(69) Science Park (Newark; 27.7%)
(75) Columbia (Maplewood; 61.7%)
(77) Somerville (Somerville; 78.5%)
(83) Dwight Morrow (Englewood; 47.7%)
(94) Montclair (Montclair; 63%)

(*Apparently, as a matter of admissions policy, McNair enrolls exactly 25% white, 25% Asian, 25% black, and 25% Hispanic students)

I should point out that I don’t believe in racial "explanations" for the by-now-well-documented "achievement gap". But there’s no denying that the gap exists. (see http://bit.ly/86WnB) Acknowledging that gap, and then also acknowledging that the eight schools above are the only ones in the "top 100" in NJ whose student body includes a percentage of black and Hispanic students at or above the national average, and thus are more likely than the others to reflect that gap in their assessments, complicates the picture that this NJ Monthly ranking paints.

The one totally unambiguous conclusion that I’ve made so far is that the real shining star in New Jersey’s educational firmament is McNair Academy. Everything else is open to debate and interpretation.

Posted by: Pete, Montclair | Sep 10, 2010 14:50:03 PM |

correction

per Princeton Regional web site "The September issue of New Jersey Monthly ranks all of the state’s high schools annually. Princeton High School is traditionally in the top several schools; last year was #6. One of the major factors for the ranking is the percentage of graduates going to four year colleges and universities. The PHS class of 2009 had 85% going to four -year post-secondary schools; 8% attending two-year schools. Unfortunately, the magazine had 66% as our four-year rate; thus, they show a ranking for PHS this year at #44....an anomaly that jumps off the page! New Jersey Monthly will note this in the November 2010 issue.:

Posted by: Ken Verbeyst (Realtor Prudential Fox&Roach, Princeton), Princeton | Sep 27, 2010 15:17:16 PM |

Passic County Technical Institute Vocational High School

What about PCTI. In my opinion we have a great school, better than eastside and Kennedy high school put together. PCTI always beat out the "inner city" schools what happened now.

Posted by: Ariell Towles, Paterson | Nov 04, 2010 16:41:32 PM |

data set

Given that your data is 2008 it is hard to see it as relevant when the district administration will just say, well they are using two year old data and here are our results from last spring. Why can’t you use a more recent data set? Or at least, not tag your article as a 2010 ranking, which is somewhat misleading.

Posted by: Patricia Fantulin, Midland Park | Nov 17, 2010 13:10:44 PM |

School Data Availability and Scoring

unfortunately the Obama administration pulled down all school performance data and scoring information from public sites. I’m not sure why they did that, other than knowing that they do no really care much for measuring actual performance and care more about how hard you try. This is probably in the master plan of their future scheming plans so nobody has data to the contradict what they say as they continue to back their political supporters from the teachers Unions.

All these sites are using incomplete or old data now
IES is averaging data from as far back as 1986 http://nces.ed.gov/ccd/ccddata.asp

School Matters is shutdown due to the CCSSO no longer releasing data publicly since shortly after Obama took office http://www.schoolmatters.com/ you can find the same message can be found on http://www.schooldatadirect.org/ where the data is usually published for syndication or download by all the other sites who then examine the data.

Never trust what people tell you, never trust polls if you don’t know where or how that data was collected. It is extremely easy to be manipulated to paint a picture the way you want it to look and have backup for an agenda. Remember everything is run by politics even if you don’t like politics it injects itself in the matters you care about most. That’s how they get you involved.

The one thing I noticed about how schools have changed their scoring and how they’re ranked by many sites (not sure if this site does it) is they give extra points and higher ranking for things like "diversity", WHAT!!!!

I know when I have kids and send mine to school, that will be very low on the importance factor list to me. I care more about grade scores, if the bar was raised or lowered to obtain higher grade scores, the % of students that go on to college and then the percentage of students who go on to attend ivy league schools, the average SAT scores by category. Important subjects, math, science, history (real history and not the re-written agenda driven type), languages, English being a major one that should include grammar.

The problems with NJEA, NEA and many liberal groups and unions is they look to lower the bar for the teachers they represent or have an agenda driven interest to see scores rise but don’t really want to do much or spend much to achieve that goal and in doing so makes it appear they are performing better when in all actuality they simply lowered the achievement level to reach. This will also make some seem like they are excelling to extremes.

While the extra curricular activities and diversity are good,they should in no way whatsoever replace actual education curriculum.

But that’s just my opinion for whatever it’s worth.

Posted by: YIRMASTER, New Jersey | Nov 17, 2010 16:17:47 PM |

Top 100 Public High schools

Check this out!

Posted by: Darrylwashington, Willingboro | Jan 10, 2011 04:34:57 AM |

Why are they ranking 2 high shools that are no more.

In Union city we no longer have two high school’s. What is going on here?

Posted by: Adam, Union city | Feb 06, 2011 20:30:48 PM |

wow

Does anyone here have a problem with the fact that all the affluent areas are ranked at the top? I find this disgusting. This is discrimination. We all have a right to the same education for our children, do we not? Talk about misappropriation of funds!

Posted by: dee, new jersey | Mar 03, 2011 03:27:31 AM |

Why is McNair allowed on this list?

McNair Academic is the only magnet high school (admission requirements include PSAT, middle school grades) on this list. Why is this school on a list of public schools, but no other magnets like High Tech High or Bergen Academies??

Posted by: Jillian, Englewood NJ | Mar 14, 2011 23:20:11 PM |

CHS

cranford high school is a joke..

Posted by: William, Cranford | Apr 09, 2011 18:45:16 PM |

AAST

Where is the Academy for the Advancement of Science and technology (which i am going to next year), or any of the academies in Bergen County Academies? We have a nationally ranked math team that is better than that of any high school on the list (we got 9th at ARML last year, and we beat thomas jefferson, the number 1 high school in america), we have a very smart student body (you have to apply to get in), and we are the only high school in america that has THREE electron microscopes. Some university professors even come to the school to use the equipment. By the way, BCA is a public school, not a private school, even though you have to apply to get in.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan, closter | Apr 18, 2011 02:45:27 AM |

AAST

Where is the Academy for the Advancement of Science and technology (which i am going to next year), or any of the academies in Bergen County Academies? We have a nationally ranked math team that is better than that of any high school on the list (we got 9th at ARML last year, and we beat thomas jefferson, the number 1 high school in america), we have a very smart student body (you have to apply to get in), and we are the only high school in america that has THREE electron microscopes. Some university professors even come to the school to use the equipment. By the way, BCA is a public school, not a private school, even though you have to apply to get in.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan, closter | Apr 18, 2011 02:45:27 AM |

AAST

Where is the Academy for the Advancement of Science and technology (which i am going to next year), or any of the academies in Bergen County Academies? We have a nationally ranked math team that is better than that of any high school on the list (we got 9th at ARML last year, and we beat thomas jefferson, the number 1 high school in america), we have a very smart student body (you have to apply to get in), and we are the only high school in america that has THREE electron microscopes. Some university professors even come to the school to use the equipment. By the way, BCA is a public school, not a private school, even though you have to apply to get in.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan, closter | Apr 18, 2011 02:45:27 AM |

AAST

Where is the Academy for the Advancement of Science and technology (which i am going to next year), or any of the academies in Bergen County Academies? We have a nationally ranked math team that is better than that of any high school on the list (we got 9th at ARML last year, and we beat thomas jefferson, the number 1 high school in america), we have a very smart student body (you have to apply to get in), and we are the only high school in america that has THREE electron microscopes. Some university professors even come to the school to use the equipment. By the way, BCA is a public school, not a private school, even though you have to apply to get in.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan, closter | Apr 18, 2011 02:45:28 AM |

AAST

Where is the Academy for the Advancement of Science and technology (which i am going to next year), or any of the academies in Bergen County Academies? We have a nationally ranked math team that is better than that of any high school on the list (we got 9th at ARML last year, and we beat thomas jefferson, the number 1 high school in america), we have a very smart student body (you have to apply to get in), and we are the only high school in america that has THREE electron microscopes. Some university professors even come to the school to use the equipment. By the way, BCA is a public school, not a private school, even though you have to apply to get in.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan, closter | Apr 18, 2011 02:45:32 AM |

AAST

Where is the Academy for the Advancement of Science and technology (which i am going to next year), or any of the academies in Bergen County Academies? We have a nationally ranked math team that is better than that of any high school on the list (we got 9th at ARML last year, and we beat thomas jefferson, the number 1 high school in america), we have a very smart student body (you have to apply to get in), and we are the only high school in america that has THREE electron microscopes. Some university professors even come to the school to use the equipment. By the way, BCA is a public school, not a private school, even though you have to apply to get in.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan, closter | Apr 18, 2011 02:45:33 AM |

sorry about the multiple posts

Sorry My ipad was a bit slow so i touched the submit button multiple times. Also how is west windsor plainsboro south lower than northern valley demarest (the school i would have gone to if i had gotten rejected from AAST)? WWPS won NJ scioly and NVD doesn’t even have a team. Is this study based on the intelligence and achievements of the students (like it should be) or is it based on the school and the faculty? If it were based on the students, west windsor would be at the top of the list, no question.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan, closter | Apr 18, 2011 02:51:55 AM |

AAST

Where is the Academy for the Advancement of Science and technology (which i am going to next year), or any of the academies in Bergen County Academies? We have a nationally ranked math team that is better than that of any high school on the list (we got 9th at ARML last year, and we beat thomas jefferson, the number 1 high school in america), we have a very smart student body (you have to apply to get in), and we are the only high school in america that has THREE electron microscopes. Some university professors even come to the school to use the equipment. By the way, BCA is a public school, not a private school, even though you have to apply to get in.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan, closter | Apr 18, 2011 02:45:31 AM |

AAST

Where is the Academy for the Advancement of Science and technology (which i am going to next year), or any of the academies in Bergen County Academies? We have a nationally ranked math team that is better than that of any high school on the list (we got 9th at ARML last year, and we beat thomas jefferson, the number 1 high school in america), we have a very smart student body (you have to apply to get in), and we are the only high school in america that has THREE electron microscopes. Some university professors even come to the school to use the equipment. By the way, BCA is a public school, not a private school, even though you have to apply to get in.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan, closter | Apr 18, 2011 02:45:33 AM |

AAST

Where is the Academy for the Advancement of Science and technology (which i am going to next year), or any of the academies in Bergen County Academies? We have a nationally ranked math team that is better than that of any high school on the list (we got 9th at ARML last year, and we beat thomas jefferson, the number 1 high school in america), we have a very smart student body (you have to apply to get in), and we are the only high school in america that has THREE electron microscopes. Some university professors even come to the school to use the equipment. By the way, BCA is a public school, not a private school, even though you have to apply to get in.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan, closter | Apr 18, 2011 02:45:31 AM |

AAST

Where is the Academy for the Advancement of Science and technology (which i am going to next year), or any of the academies in Bergen County Academies? We have a nationally ranked math team that is better than that of any high school on the list (we got 9th at ARML last year, and we beat thomas jefferson, the number 1 high school in america), we have a very smart student body (you have to apply to get in), and we are the only high school in america that has THREE electron microscopes. Some university professors even come to the school to use the equipment. By the way, BCA is a public school, not a private school, even though you have to apply to get in.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan, closter | Apr 18, 2011 02:45:34 AM |

Academy High Schools

You are correct in addressing the fact that the Academy High Schools are not on the list. Most people in NJ do not even know that they exist and the way they are funded compared to other high schools in the state. This is one of Nj’s best kept secrets. Just think about how small the class sizes are at the Academy schools (less than 10 the last time I checked). With all the funding they receive and the fact that the class sizes are very small along with testing requirements for admittance, of course these schools will have some of the best and the brightest students and faculty in NJ.

Posted by: Nick Jackson, Mt. Laurel | Jul 22, 2011 20:46:20 PM |

There may be soe error in your ranking model

I have strong suspision that there is some error in your model, at least some data error regarding to the rankign of Priceton. It dropped from 6 to 44. If you check your data on SAT average, Priceton has one of teh highest. It almost impossible to drop to so low. Double-check the data of Priceton.

Posted by: Alan Wang, Parsippany, NJ | Aug 22, 2011 18:34:54 PM |

Incomplete

With 15% of the NJ high School population going to private, why would you publish such a skewed list. I understand that adding private schools would take some statistcal work, that perhaps your staff is not capable of, butjust regurgitaing a list from the department of education is a complete waste of time and incredibly misleading. I would have thought NJ Monthly would have a higher level of journalism. Makes me question the quality of restaurant reviews and advertisers.

Posted by: Joe Marazzi, Wayne | Sep 15, 2011 02:36:15 AM |

Login in to your website

Where do I log on from? I’m a member of this website and I cannot find where to login from.

Posted by: Hi cham, North Bergen | Feb 12, 2012 17:53:47 PM |

Just a Thought

I know this comment is a little late, but I was reading through this article and all the comments and thought I should give my two cents. I think it is ridiculous to state that a school being in an affluent area is the reason why it’s ranked higher than schools in less well to do areas. I went to high school at Northern Highlands Regional High School, which as you can see is ranked number six on the list, and from what I learned it is not about the money student’s have, hell it was the wealthiest students who were usually the stupidest; it’s about their motivation. Motivated students, ones who are actually trying to gain something from high school, are going to perform better and therefore reflect better on their school. It’s as simple as that. If you’re a parent, teacher, school administrator, etc., blaming the lack of success in your school on money is not the thing to do. What should be done is start focusing on getting your students to want to do well, and once students are in that mindset they will begin to preform better on tests and whatnot, and you will see that, in the end, the difference between the first and last place schools on this list is not money, but just a simple difference in mindsets.

Posted by: Jimmy D, Allendale, NJ | Apr 09, 2012 08:41:31 AM |

Princeton

THERE IS NO POSSIBLE WAY THAT THIS NEW SYSTEM OF RANKING IS VALID AND RELIABLE. PRINCETON IS ONB OF THE TOP NON PRIVATE SCHOOLS IN THE COUNTRY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by: Jennifer, Basking Ridge | May 08, 2012 00:46:57 AM |

Princeton

THERE IS NO POSSIBLE WAY THAT THIS NEW SYSTEM OF RANKING IS VALID AND RELIABLE. PRINCETON IS ONB OF THE TOP NON PRIVATE SCHOOLS IN THE COUNTRY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by: Jennifer, Basking Ridge | May 08, 2012 00:46:56 AM |

Princeton

THERE IS NO POSSIBLE WAY THAT THIS NEW SYSTEM OF RANKING IS VALID AND RELIABLE. PRINCETON IS ONB OF THE TOP NON PRIVATE SCHOOLS IN THE COUNTRY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by: Jennifer, Basking Ridge | May 08, 2012 00:46:59 AM |

Princeton

THERE IS NO POSSIBLE WAY THAT THIS NEW SYSTEM OF RANKING IS VALID AND RELIABLE. PRINCETON IS ONB OF THE TOP NON PRIVATE SCHOOLS IN THE COUNTRY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by: Jennifer, Basking Ridge | May 08, 2012 00:47:00 AM |

Socioeconomics, and this list

Someone above this made a reference to "motivation" being the determining factor in ranking higher on the list. Unfortunately, if you look at that list and use his definition, the schools with the most motivated students are clearly the wealthier towns. Millburn? Glen Ridge? Haddonfield? But there’s more. The specialty academies and focus schools (Monmouth County has a bunch, Bergen Academies, McNair) are going to have bloated numbers because of who attends those schools, and their focuses push more kids into AP programs with success. They should be at the top. Geography plays a huge role. North vs. South Jersey...it’s frightening how divided the list is statewide. Look generally. It’s all there, and we know about the socioeconomic divisions there. Finally, look at how some schools have made enormous jumps, up or down. The reasons for these jumps are not made clear by the list. The reason your town went so far up or so far down could be as simple as a program being added or cut in 2009. It could have to do with a change in enrollment (their formula says it doesn’t calculate based on enrollment, but it does take into account number of AP programs, and scores. If a program changes, you just took enrollment into account guys). It could be a retirement! The 2012 list is going to be chaotic, and it means LITTLE. Wanna know how well your school is doing? Talk to the kids who are finishing up college now. They’ll tell you. And ask a few teachers. They’ll be honest.

Posted by: Dave, Delanco | Jul 06, 2012 02:54:05 AM |



Web Analytics