Most Recent in History

P.O.T.U.S. Flower

By Terry Golway | September 18, 2014
After serving as president of Princeton University, this transplanted southerner was elected governor of New Jersey in 1910. Without that step, it’s hard to imagine that he could have been elected the 28th P.O.T.U.S. two years later....
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Rage Against the Machine

By Terry Golway | September 18, 2014
As Newark commemorates the 40th anniversary of the catastrophic disturbances of 1967, Gibson has enjoyed a brief return to the public spotlight, and understandably so. Gibson became the city’s first African-American mayor after a bitter election battle with Hugh Addonizio in 1970. His victory did not lead to a revival of the shattered city. But it did mark a victory for the state’s African-American population....
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No, Not the Muppet

By Terry Golway | September 18, 2014

He was the only president  born in the state (in Caldwell, in 1837), the only president to serve nonconsecutive terms… Read the rest

House Proud

By Terry Golway | September 18, 2014
She was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1974 and served four terms. A Republican, she was famously independent, known for her pipe smoking and her blueblood style. She inspired the character of Lacey Davenport in Garry Trudeau’s comic strip, Doonesbury....
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Why He’s a Bridge

By Terry Golway | September 18, 2014
Most New Jerseyans know him as a bridge on the Garden State Parkway. But Driscoll earned that immortality as the first governor empowered by the Constitution of 1947. As a reformer, a champion of civil rights, and a conservationist, Driscoll set the template for future activist governors. He served from 1947 to 1954....
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Executive Clout

By Terry Golway | September 18, 2014
New Jersey had one of the weakest governor’s offices in the country until the state Constitution was rewritten after World War II. The war and the New Deal had shown the importance of strong executive guidance, leading to the revisions. Today, the state has perhaps the most powerful governor’s office in the nation....
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Commanding Presence

By Terry Golway | September 18, 2014
William Livingston was born in Albany in 1723, a member of a wealthy Hudson Valley family. He attended Yale and set up shop as a politically connected lawyer in New York City, but when he and his family fell out of favor in 1772, he, like many other disillusioned New Yorkers through the years, moved to New Jersey....
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A tarpaper shack that could be rotated to catch the sun was America’s first motion picture studio. Thomas Edison’s 1888 “Black Maria” put New Jersey at the center of a revolutionary new medium and big-time business....
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A Sip for the Soldiers

By Terry Golway | September 18, 2014
Who was she? Did she really even exist? We know her real name was not Molly Pitcher—that was the nickname she earned on the battlefield, perhaps while bringing water to parched soldiers....
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(1885–1977) A suffrage activist who lived to see the nation’s bicentennial, Paul, a Quaker from Moorestown, earned a doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania and law degrees from Columbia and American universities at a time when few women attended college. She not only advocated for women’s voting rights, in 1964 she helped persuade Congress to add a ban on sex discrimination to the Civil Rights Act....
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Blue-Collar Heroes

By Terry Golway | September 18, 2014
This local dispute garnered national attention. In the end, workers didn’t get everything they wanted, but the strike captured the imaginations of activists around the country, even in New York City—perhaps the last time an injustice in New Jersey received attention on the east bank of the Hudson....
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A Cliff Before Dying

By Terry Golway | September 18, 2014
His last day on Earth was spent in New Jersey. On the cliffs overlooking the North River (as the Hudson was called) and Manhattan Island, he was shot by the vice president of the United States, Aaron Burr, during a duel....
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Burn

By Terry Golway | September 18, 2014
The media, including this magazine, have been chronicling the 40th anniversary of Newark’s catastrophic summer of 1967...
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The Original Jersey Guys

By Terry Golway | September 18, 2014
Lords Berkeley (1607–1678) and Carteret (1610–1680) They were much more than upper-class white males with fancy hairdos and flowing robes....
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Hard Landing

By Terry Golway | September 18, 2014
(1902–1974) Lucky Lindy, the greatest American hero of the Jazz Age, moved to New Jersey after his marriage to Anne Morrow in 1929, two years after he became the first person to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean....
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The Battle of Trenton

By Terry Golway | September 18, 2014
George Washington’s surprise attack turned the tide for the stars and stripes....
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Setting Precedent

By Eric Levin | September 18, 2014
Her classmates at Newark’s East Side High School voted her Most Likely to Succeed, and that she did. She earned her master’s degree at Montclair State and her Ph.D. from Columbia University....
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First and Foremost

By Eric Levin | September 18, 2014
(1902-1962) Her research for the NAACP helped convince the Supreme Court in 1954 that separate is not equal in education. After graduating from Barringer High School in Newark, Wright became the first African-American woman in the U.S. to earn a Ph.D. in history (from Columbia, in 1940)....
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Among the more than 100 patents he obtained while working for RCA, Rajchman developed the electron multiplier calculating device; the read-only memory computer system; the magnetic information-handling system (core memory); and the electronic microcopy apparatus. Your computer would not be the same without Rajchman’s innovations....
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Germ Warfare

By Will Hughes | September 18, 2014

While investigating soil microbiology and the medicinal properties of soil organisms at Rutgers, Waksman discovered streptomycin and other antibiotics. He… Read the rest